Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Quote du jour

It is never wrong to be on the side of freedom - never.
-Victor Davis Hanson

3 comments:

  1. .

    "It is never wrong to be on the side of freedom - never."

    So how's your 'Arab Spring' working out for you?

    Can't seem to keep things straight; first you are for freedom before you are against it. Now you are for it. Really, don't cha get tired of whip lash?

    FREEDOM and LIBERTY are meaningless Madison Avenue slogans.



    Ema Nymton
    ~@:o?
    .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Ema: We always thought you liberals were against freedom, and here, you're the first person to register your vote!

      It wasn't "my" Arab Spring, imbecile. The liberal press and liberal politicians like Obama were drooling all over themselves about the Arab Spring, while more level headed people like myself were dubious about who these "rebels" were and what their agenda might be. Mind Read Fail, Ematroll! The only one here who cannot keep straight what you are for is you, Emetic.

      "FREEDOM and LIBERTY are meaningless Madison Avenue slogans."

      And you wonder why liberals have their patriotism questioned? Seriously, Ema, where you are now, you'd have to work 24/7 just to become another liberal joke. Maybe that can be your New Year's resolution?

      In parting, have you ever considered that if it is never wrong to be on the side of freedom (true freedom, not whatever political movement happens to be in the street at the time), and you believe that freedom is a meaningless slogan, that consequently, you are never right?

      That's certainly been our experience with you here. Happy Boxing Day, Ema!

      Delete
  2. Here's a little piece of mine of what I thought of the so called Arab Spring at the time.. Who Is the Libyan Jefferson Davis? http://proof-proofpositive.blogspot.com/2011/03/who-is-libyan-jefferson-davis.html

    If I may quote myself:

    "As bad as Mubarak and Qaddafi have been, one of the things that have bothered me about this administration's rush to remove Egyptian and Libyan dictators, is the uncertainty of who or what would be replacing them. I believe that part of the reticence to take out Saddam during the first Gulf War, was not knowing who would fill the vacuum of his passing. Better the devil you know...

    And now, it appears that some of the "rebels" in Libya have Al-Qaeda connections. What's to prevent a radical Muslim takeover or either Egypt or Libya (or both)? The terrorist group Hamas was "democratically" elected to govern the Gaza strip. Merely holding an election is not enough to institute the democratic reforms needed to sustain a Jeffersonian democracy (or a democratic republic, if you will.)" - March 29, 2011

    ReplyDelete

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